Went to Wales

I had to go to Swansea for a short business trip. I hadn't been to Wales in about 20 years, and all I remember from last time was that it rained endlessly. And we went on a train.

This time, no train, and we had some gaps in the rain!

This was my welcome at the hotel - some Welsh cakes (delicious!) and a little bottle of Grays & Feather bubbly (not tried yet)! 


This was the view of the marina from my hotel room:


I'd been in the car from 7am through 12:30 (thank you, M25 at rush hour) and then in and out of meetings all afternoon. By the time we got to the hotel, I was in dire need of a little bit of exercise. I'd looked online and seen that they had a pool, so had brought my swimsuit rather than my running gear. I didn't have enough time for a swim, so I decided to go for a walk. I asked at reception if there was a good place for a walk nearby, and the chap on reception told me to walk to the back of the car park and turn left, where I would find the promenade.


It was SO beautiful and reminded me of Jones Beach (and made me wish I'd brought my running gear)!


I got a little carried away with the pictures.



Apparently dogs in Wales understand Welsh and English.


No idea what this sculpture is, but I thought it was really neat.




So that was my brief encounter with Swansea. Who knew?!

Comments

  1. Apparently it's called the Lighthouse Tower.

    "The octagonal tower relates to the identity and morphology of the site; it emphasises the importance of the connection between land and sea, and relates to panoramic views across Swansea Bay to lighthouses near and far. While acknowledging its sources directly, the steel upper sections are finished with copper coloured paint which relates to the metallurgical history and development of the lower Swansea Valley. The tower combines the old with the new; it has Victorian and Edwardian presence. It represents man-made objects, and is not abstract, although contemporary sculptural considerations such as aesthetic balance, form, colour, scale and texture are expressed through the representation of the functional object."

    http://www.pmsa.org.uk/pmsa-database/11613

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    Replies
    1. Ooh...I need to up my research game! :)

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  2. The train you rode twenty years ago was the steam rack railroad up Mount Snowdon. It was drizzling at the bottom, foggy on the trip up and back, and freezing fog at the summit. I'll try and find the photos....

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